First home super saver scheme to assist with saving for a deposit

If you wish to explore the following exert further please contact the office on 039846 6542 or email info@townshendassociates.com

From the ATO

You can start saving by entering into a salary sacrifice arrangement with your employer to make voluntary contributions or by making voluntary personal super contributions. You can contribute into any super fund, although contributions made to a defined benefit interest or a constitutionally protected fund will not be eligible to be released under the FHSS scheme. It is also possible to contribute into more than one fund.

Note: Some employers may not offer salary sacrifice arrangements to their employees.

Before you start saving you should:

  • check that your nominated super fund/s will release the money
  • ask your fund about any fees, charges and insurance implications that may apply
  • be aware that if you receive FHSS amounts, it will affect your tax for the year in which you make the request to release. You will receive a payment summary, and you will need to include both the assessable and tax-withheld amounts in your tax return.

If you want to be considered under the financial hardship provision then you should ask us to determine if these provisions apply to you before you start saving.

Home attached to your business? Better read this

Cross-posted from mybusiness.com.au

An insolvency specialist is warning business owners to be alert to the risks associated with falling property prices, given the family home is often used as security for business finance.

Trent Devine, a partner at Jirsch Sutherland, suggested that the huge boom in values – particularly on Australia’s east coast – has helped many businesses stay afloat by dipping into equity. But this strategy may now come back to bite them, amid a backdrop of falling property prices and banks hiking interest rates.

“Any business that has used personal finances for business borrowings is at risk,” said Mr Devine.

“In the past, when times were tough, struggling businesses have been able to lean on the equity of their home. Now, with falling house prices and other factors, this can have a disastrous knock-on effect for businesses.

“As property prices continue to fall, there is reduced levels of equity with which to finance or prop up a business.”

According to Mr Devine, a key risk for business insolvency is an “ill-advised link” between personal and business finances. Yet this is often unavoidable for new businesses.

“SMBs often use the same bank for the business that they use for personal banking, therefore they’re likely cross-collateralised,” he said.

“They may have their mortgage and business loan with the same bank. They don’t separate one from the other.”

This situation makes it much easier for the bank to assess the health of the business owner’s finances and make much earlier decisions on whether to push for insolvency.

“Rises in interest rates and resulting mortgage stress can certainly flow onto businesses as we’ve witnessed over the past 12 months. If a business is struggling, banks might now note that there’s now no property to support that business because the mortgage is under stress. Clearly, this means that business insolvency becomes a strong possibility,” said Mr Devine.

He urged business leaders to protect themselves by separating business and personal finances.

“Use different banks for business and personal uses so that cross-collateralisation is not an issue. If you are utilising personal funds, perhaps a secured loan to the business rather than opting for a capital injection might also be an option,” he advised.

“Also, business owners who are looking to refinance to help fund their business’ cash flow might find this difficult because of falling house prices.

“When first setting up a business, money can be incredibly tight, but it’s important for business owners to take the time and speak to their accountant or adviser to get the most appropriate advice. Options do exist and it’s important to explore them or risk losing everything.”

Mr Devine’s comments come after property data firm CoreLogic suggested banks are only exacerbating the housing downturn by raiding home loan rates, meaning the current lull in most mainland capital cities will linger for longer.

Latest figures from the firm show that prices have fallen by 5.9 per cent in Sydney over the last 12 months, and by 2.5 per cent in both Melbourne and Perth. Melbourne has also overtaken Sydney as the city with the fastest falling home values, down by 3.8 per cent so far in 2018, compared with Sydney’s 2.7 per cent slump.

Hobart is currently the nation’s star performing market, posting double-digit price growth over the past year.

We believe that Accountants are central in advising people in making sound business decisions, if you would like to discuss this matter or any other matter please contact us on 03 9846 6542 or email info@townshendassociates.com

Finance drives everything — including your insecurity at work

An excellent article by Professor David Peetz and puts in focus the need to find your financial journey in this world.

From the conversation:

There’s a common link between the many things that have promoted insecurity at work: the growth of franchising; labour hire; contracting out; spin-off firms; outsourcing; global supply chains; the gig economy; and so on. It’s money.

At first, that seems too obvious to say. But I’m talking about the way financial concerns have taken control of seemingly every aspect of organisational decision-making.

And behind that lies the rise and rise of finance capital.

Over the past three decades there has been a shift in resources from the rest of the economy to finance. Specifically, to finance capital.

One way to see this is in the chart below. It shows the income shares of labour and capital, and the breakdown for each between the finance and non-finance (“industrial”) sectors, in two four-year periods. They were 1990-91 to 1993-94 (when the ABS started publishing income by industry) and, most recently, 2013-14 to 2016-17. (I use four-year periods to reduce annual fluctuations and show the longer-term trends. Here is more detail and explanation of methods.)

Income shares of labour and capital

Factor shares by industry, 1990-94 and 2013-17. Source: ABS Cat No 5206.0

The key thing to notice in the chart is that finance capital’s share of national income doubled (it’s the dark red boxes in the lower right-hand side of the chart), while everyone else’s went down.

So, over that quarter-century, the share of labour income (wages, salaries and supplements) in national income fell. In the early 1990s it totalled 55.02% — that’s what you get when you add labour income in finance, 3.21%, to labour income in “industrial” sectors, 51.81%. In recent years this fell to 53.58%. There were falls in both finance labour income (from 3.81 to 2.83% of national income) and industrial labour income.

The total share of profits and “mixed income” accordingly rose from 44.99% to 46.42%. The thing is, all of that increase (and a bit more) went to finance capital. Profits in finance went from 3.16% to 6.16% of the economy.

At the same time there has been a large increase in the share of national income going to the very wealthy — the top 0.1% — in Australia and many other countries.

This shift in resources does not reflect more people being needed to do important finance jobs. Nor is it higher rewards for workers in finance. The portion of national income, and for that matter employment, devoted to labour in the financial sector actually fell from 3.21% to 2.83%.

The economy devotes proportionately no more labour time now to financial services than it did a quarter century ago. Yet rewards to finance have increased immensely. The share of national income going to “industrial” sector profits and “mixed income” has declined.

In short, the widely recognised shift in income from labour to capital is really a net shift in income from labour, and from capital (including unincorporated enterprises) in other industries, to finance capital.

Finance matters

You may have heard about “financialisation”. It’s not really about more financial activity. It is about the growth of finance capital and its impact on the behaviour of other actors.

Financialisation has led to finance capital taking the lead shareholdings in most large corporations, not just in Australia but in other major countries (to varying degrees) as well.

This role as main shareholder and, of course, chief lender to industrial capital has driven the corporate restructuring over the past three decades that has led to greater worker insecurity and low wages growth (as I recently discussed here).


Read more: Who owns the world? Tracing half the corporate giants’ shares to 30 owners


When “industrial capital” has been restructured over recent decades — to promote franchising, labour hire, contracting out, spin-off firms, outsourcing, global supply chains, and even the emergence of the gig economy — it has been driven by the demands of finance capital. Casualisation is just one manifestation of this.

Short-term logic

Now there’s no conspiracy here (or, at least, the system doesn’t rely on one). There is actually a lot of competitive mindset in the financial sector. This is just the logic of how the system increasingly has come to work. Financial returns, particularly over the short term, have become the principal (really, the only) fact driving corporate behaviour.

This has come at the expense of human considerations.

That same logic is behind resistance to action on climate change. Continuing carbon emissions are the perfect, and deadly, example of short-term profits overriding longer-term interests.

Yet even finance capital is not monolithic. There are parts of finance capital that have a longer-term perspective (“there’s no business on a dead planet”). So they are effectively in battle with those parts of finance capital for which the short term is everything. The former want governments to intervene in, for example, carbon pricing.


Read more: Class and climate: how financial warfare affects the air


Policy questions

All this leaves some big questions for policymakers about how to redress the new imbalance of power.

In part, it requires changing institutional arrangements (including industrial relations laws) that in recent years have made it much harder for workers to obtain a fair share of increases in national income. It requires rethinking of how we regulate work.

But it also requires rethinking of how we regulate product markets and financial markets.

The almost global reduction in regulation of the financial sector over three decades ago has ultimately led to this imbalance. It is time to rethink all of that.